Monday, October 19, 2009

REVOLT


In Marvelous Land of OZ #3 a very interesting army will rise. REVOLT!

21 comments:

Mark said...

Awesome!

An said...

good and excellent work. That old texture enchants to me. Sa├║dos and apertas

ANDY KUHN said...

BADASS!!!

Javier M. said...

Love it! Where did you get the paper texture? Kick Ass!

Jason Crawford. said...

Yeah-boy, loving the texture and colour.

Fabian said...

YYYEEESS!!! Now i want it even more!! :) Great piece!!!

Arkonbey said...

Entirely, entirely awesome! The power and weight of the figure is wonderful. It deserves to be done as multi-color block print.

I might have gone with a different color for the 'rays' though; "Imperial Japanese Navy" just jumps to mind with red on white rays.

Ken said...

Sweet! How long is the series going to be, 8 issues like the last one?

RAWLS said...

Coolness!

the mountain king said...

that looks glorious.

i cannot wait for this comic to come out.

how did you do that texture?

Anonymous said...

Why did you delete the Shepard Fairey question? I thought it was rude, but it did bring up a valid point, the new piece does have a very heavy Shepard Fairey influence , should you give the guy some credit? If anyone disagrees , just google his work.

Skottie Young said...

Anonymous,

I'm always open to comments, both positive and negative. However, when negative comments are left under the Anonymous tag, I usually delete them. I love open discussion but part of the advantage of it being my site is the choice to not debate subjects with "anonymous" posters.

As far as the cover is concerned, while I enjoy some of Shepard Fairey's work, he was not the source of inspiration at all. He is a good designer, but did not invent the graphic nature of the propaganda posters used during the World Wars. As the issue focuses on the rise of an Army against the ruler of Oz, I thought it would fit very well to utilize those same notions. Yes, Mr. Fairey has made this style popular in recent years, but it was around long before he was born and will probably be around long after we're gone.

Again, all comments and opinions are welcome, but accusing me of plagiarism will more than likely be deleted. No disrespect intended.

Thanks for your time and being a part of my blog. Hopefully future works will be more to your liking.

s.

Skottie Young said...

And thanks a ton for all the great comments everyone. Glad you're enjoying the new images from Land of Oz.

Anonymous said...

I understand you don't see how similar your piece is to his, but you should really take a look again. Not only did you use the red rays ( very visible in Shepard Fairey's work) but you also used his color scheme as well. I understand you are saying that the OZ cover is based on the Propaganda poster of WWII , but come on. The similarities are just too much for you to say you were not heavily influenced by Fairey's work. And I believe it is a bit disrespectful to call him a designer, he's an artist just like you .

Anonymous said...

if you don't see the similarities now, take a look at his work

http://www.formatmag.com/features/shepard-fairey/

Skottie Young said...

Thank you for taking the time to comment. I'm sure you will see my piece in Fairey's work as he took his inspirations from the same places. Propaganda posters. Google Japanese Sun and you'll see where I took my idea for the rays from. And the color scheme was inspired by the same place. You'll notice a heavy use of parchment in japanese art and prints.

Calling someone a designer is not a sign of disrespect. To me, designer and artist are one in the same.

Thanks again for stopping by.

Anonymous said...

Just did a google and I fail to see what you are talking about, perhaps you could supply a link?
Just a side not, when you do a search ,Shepard's work is one of the first results. Thanks for taking the time to answer some of my questions.

Designer and artist are the same??? Strange

Skottie Young said...

We'll just boil it down to the fact that there is nothing new under the sun and sooner or later all our inspirations are sources are going to start to cross paths. I was doing my take on propaganda posters and Fairey never came into my mind. Though working in that theme, I'm going to probably land somewhere in his neighborhood.

As far as "artist" "designer" titles. I'm not that deep man. I don't put that much weight on the title. Call me a scribbler, designer, artist, cartoonist... at the end of the day I draw pictures and have fun. Call it way you will.

When I did google Fairey tonight I came across this link. Since you brought up sources and credit it seemed fitting to pop up. Small world.

The most common rule of art is "There is nothing new under the sun." We're all a step away from someone else. Wether on purpose or by accident. Either way, it get's people talking, reacting, debating, enjoying, etc.

Thanks again for stopping by and sharing your thoughts and opinions. Now, I gotta call it night or my 8.5 month pregnant lady is going to hurt me.

s.

Skottie Young said...

oops, forgot the link.

http://www.art-for-a-change.com/Obey/index.htm

ok, i'm going to bed now...haha.

Take it easy.

Arkonbey said...

Anonymous seems to be missing the point completely. The only similarity between Skottie's poster and Fairey's poster are the rays (even then, Fairey's poster uses halftone gradients on the rays while Skottie's are solid).

I like some of Fairey's work but, to say that Skottie copied him is ludicrous. If you want to bring up copying, google-ing Soviet propaganda posters will put Fairey's work in perspective. Heck the article you linked even mentioned Russian Constructivists as one of his influences.

Those are the works that Skottie was influcenced by

and don't discount the artist/designer connection; the line is often blurred

Dave said...

Great piece! Just curious - and some others had asked as well - where did you get the paper texture? I've been looking to do some propaganda posters myself and this would work amazing. Thanks!